2008-W Uncirculated & Proof Gold Buffalo Sales Figures


This post will take a look at the most recent sales figures for the 2008-W Uncirculated and Proof Gold Buffalo coins. Most of the US Mint’s offerings for these coins sold out earlier this week.

The sold out coins include all of the individual and four coin set offerings for both proof and uncirculated coins. There are two US Mint products still available which include Gold Buffalo coins.

The first is the 8-8-08 Double Prosperity Set. This set includes a 1/2 ounce 2008-W Gold Buffalo and 1/2 ounce 2008-W Gold Eagle. From what I have been able to determine, these coins do carry the “W” mint mark. So the Gold Buffalo coin included is comparable to the sold out individual coin. The set is priced at $1,078.88.



The second available product is the 2008 Gold Buffalo Celebration Coin. This is a one ounce 2008 Gold Buffalo coin in special packaging. It appears that this coin does not bear the “W” mint mark, which makes it comparable to the regular bullion coins. This coin is priced at $968.88.

The sales figures below come from the latest Mint Stats published by Numismaster, which report US Mint sales through December 7, 2008. That means some of the numbers may continue to increase (or decrease) from these levels. I will post another round of updated sales figures once the numbers settle down. The first column lists the sales per individual ordering option. The second column lists the cumulative totals per coin (individual sales plus 4 coin set).

2008-W Uncirculated Gold Buffalo Sales Figures

Individual Total
1 oz. 3,138 9,699
1/2 oz. 3,580 10,141
1/4 oz. 4,108 10,669
1/10 oz. 12,626 19,187
4 Coin 6,561

2008 Proof Gold Buffalo Sales Figures

Individual Total
1 oz. 11,640 19,571
1/2 oz. 4,637 12,568
1/4 oz. 5,985 13,916
1/10 oz. 11,337 19,268
4 Coin 7,931

While these numbers are definitely higher than those of the sold out 2008-W Unc & Proof Platinum Eagles reviewed yesterday, this is might outweighed by the broader collector base for the Gold Buffalo coins.

Another interesting aspect this year’s Gold Buffalo offerings is that they will stand alone as the one and only year of issuance. The 2008-W Uncirculated versions and fractional proof versions were just introduced in 2008. The US Mint recently announced the discontinuation of all collectible Gold Buffalo coins except the one ounce proof coin.

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Comments

  1. Anonymous says

    I believe the coins in the Prosperity set are just the bullion versions. Not the W mint mark versions.

  2. Anonymous says

    i received the Prosperity set and the $25 Buuf coins seem to have an error. on the side with the buuf it is ok but on the side with the Cheif’s head there is what ithink may be a “loose’ collar error.

    the con seems centered but the outter ring around the coin si somewhat off center. You can see that instead of being a complete circle, the highest point looks like it is indented in certain areas.

    It looks as if the original strike made the perfect circle, but then it came back and hit the ring off center so that it loojs as if it were cut. On’y way to explain is to take a cookie cutter and make a perfect circle, then come back and put the cookie cutter a little off center and make an indentation. I also noticed that when the stiking piece was removed it came out at an angle and riped some of the gold off, thus you have on the inside of the outter rim an area that you can see the raw gold as if someone took a knife and carved some of the gold out of it.

    The rest of the coin looks perfect, it’s just the outter rim and right inside of the raised ring or edge that has this problem. I am afriad that this is some kind of mechanical mishap and that instead of increasing the value of the coin it actually has ruined it. Any advice. Thanks

  3. Michael says

    I don’t have enough knowledge about errors to know whether this would increase or decrease the value of the coin.

    I would post some pictures on Coin Network http://www.coinnetwork.com and see what kind of advice the other members can provide.

    If this is considered more of a defect and decreases the value of the coin, you could always return it to the Mint for a replacement.

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