America the Beautiful Quarters 2017 Circulating Coin Set to go on sale November 21 at noon

On November 21, the America the Beautiful Quarters 2017 Circulating Coin Set will go on sale at noon on the Mint’s website. The set includes the 10 currently circulating America the Beautiful quarters of 2017, with half coming from the Philadelphia Mint and the other half coming from the Denver Mint. This set has no household order limit, mintage limit, or product limit, and each coin comes with the “P” or “D” mintmark from the Philadelphia or Denver mints, respectively. The packaging is designed for the coins to be easily removed if so desired as well.

Hover to zoom.

The quarters included in this set feature such national landmarks as Ozark National Scenic Riverways in Missouri, George Rogers Clark National Historical Park in Indiana, Ellis Island in New Jersey, Effigy Mounds National Monument in Iowa, and Frederick Douglass National Historic Site in the District of Columbia. Composition of the quarters consists of 8.33% nickel and balance copper. The set is also available for Product Enrollment; the item number is 17AC.




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Comments

  1. Mattarch says

    I will be ordering this set. I have the previous year’s sets and am generally happy with the sets. The quality varies considerably among the coins but the price is right.

  2. Tom P. - MA says

    Actually one of the better buys from the Mint. Only a little over 2x face.

    On average it takes about 2 years after issue to find any D mint coins here on the east coast.

    I’ve found zero collectable coins anywhere in circulation, coinstar machines or penny bins last week.

  3. DBR says

    @ Tom P. -MA

    I hear what you are saying about the delay in seeing all the mint marks in circulation. I have yet to see a 2017-P Lincoln cent in my change here on the west coast. Still looking though!

    Happy hunting!

  4. cagcrisp says

    UPDATE ON 2009 ULTRA HIGH RELIEF $20 DOUBLE EAGLE…

    How much has Prices Depreciated on One of the Most (Perceived) Successful Launches of a US Mint’s Modern Coin? In May 2016 I posted about the Opportunity Costs Lost on the purchase of the 2009 Ultra High Relief $20 Double Eagle.

    In the past 18 months prices of the 2009 Ultra High Relief Gold coin has Continued to Decline. In May of last year Liberty Coin was offering $2,045.00 for a raw coin. Today APMEX is offering the same raw coin for $1,745.00. A Decline of $300.00 a coin in 18 months.

    The following analysis will show that the 2009 Ultra High Relief $20 Double Eagle which has been the poster child for having an Initial HHL of 1 and because it was Mint to Demand has performed No better than Spot Gold since Launch and considering Lost Opportunity Costs it has been a Dismal Investment…

    2009 Ultra High Relief vs. Spot Gold bullion vs. SPY

    2009 Ultra High Relief:

    Offered on January 22nd 2009 at an Initial Mint Price of $1,189.00. First Day Sales 28,173. Offered until end of year 2009. Final Sales numbers of 115,178. Final Sales price from the Mint (December 31st 2009) for $1,489.00.

    Currently (November 11th 2017) a Major coin distributor (APMEX) has them on Their website for $1,745.00.
    IF purchased January 22nd 2009 ($1,189.00) that’s a 47% gain ($1,745.00) from Day 1 (Not considering shipping/mailing/insurance cost and not considering cost of bay fees and pal fees IF you were purchasing/selling for profit).

    IF purchased December 31st 2009 ($1,489.00) that’s a 17% gain ($1,745.00) from Last Day (Not considering shipping/mailing/insurance cost and not considering cost of bay fees and pal fees IF you were purchasing/selling for profit)

    Spot Gold bullion:

    Spot Gold bullion closed January 22nd 2009, at $855.70.
    Spot Gold bullion closed December 31st 2009 at $1,096.35.
    Spot Gold bullion closed November 10th 2017, at $1,274.90.

    IF you purchased Spot Gold bullion on January 22nd 2009, and sold same Spot Gold bullion on November 10th 2017, you would have a gain of 49%.

    IF you purchased Spot Gold bullion on December 31st 2009, and sold same Spot Gold bullion November 10th 2017, you would have a gain of 16%.

    SPY:

    SPY on January 22nd 2009, ended at Price Adjusted cost of $69.10532.
    SPY on December 31st 2009, ended at Price Adjusted cost of $95.21907.
    SPY closed Friday November 10th 2017, Price Adjusted of $258.09.

    IF you purchased SPY ($69.10532) on the Exact same day as Launch of the 2009 (January 22nd) and sold on November 10th 2017, for $258.09 you would have a 273% gain.

    IF you purchased SPY ($95.21907) on the Exact same day as the Last day offered for the 2009 (December 31st) and sold on November 10th 2017, for $258.09 you would have a 171% gain.

    SO…Comparing the 2009 Ultra High Relief vs. Spot Gold bullion vs. the SPY

    Launch Day January 22nd 2009: Ultra High Relief 47% vs. Spot Gold bullion 49% vs. SPY 273%
    Last Day December 31st 2009: Ultra High Relief 17% vs. Spot Gold bullion 16% vs. SPY 171%

    SO…IF you had purchased 10 oz. of 2009 Ultra High Relief on January 22nd 2009:

    Cost: $11,890.00
    Current Value (November 10th 2017): $17,450.00
    Profit: $5,560.00
    Profit Margin: 47%

    IF you had purchased $11,890.00 of Spot Gold bullion on January 22nd 2009:

    Cost: $11,890.00
    Ounces purchased 13.895
    Current Value (November 10th 2017): $17,714.81
    Profit: $5,824.81
    Profit Margin: 49%

    IF you had purchased $11,890.00 shares of SPY on January 22nd 2009:

    Cost: $11,890.00
    Shares purchased: 172.056
    Current Value (November 10th 2017): $44,405.99
    Profit: $32,515.99
    Profit Margin: 273%

    SO…IF you had purchased 10 oz. of 2009 Ultra High Relief on December 31st 2009:

    Cost: $14,890.00
    Current Value (November 10th 2017): $17,450.00
    Profit: $2,560.00
    Profit Margin: 17%

    IF you had purchased $14,890.00 of Spot Gold bullion on December 31st 2009:

    Cost: $14,890.00
    Ounces purchased 13.581
    Current Value (November 10th 2017): $17,314.96
    Profit: $2,424.96
    Profit Margin: 16%

    IF you had purchased $14,890.00 shares of SPY on December 31st 2009:

    Cost: $14,890.00
    Shares purchased: 156.376
    Current Value (November 10th 2017): $40,359.14
    Profit: $25,469.14
    Profit Margin: 171%

  5. Larry says

    @ Cagcrisp, perhaps, but if I was forced to sell all my coins and could keep only one, I think the 2009 UHR would be the one. The first time I heard the mint was going to make this coin, I knew I had to have one. Have they made a better coin since? Nope.

  6. So Krates says

    From the US Mint email promoting military medals… “November 10th marks the 242nd anniversary of the United States Marine Corps…”

    242nd makes 225th almost sound like a round number

  7. So Krates says

    @ Tom P.

    Coinstar still producing out my way

    Yesterday I got:

    1915 Big British Penny XF (This one made me smile)
    2002 British Penny
    1988 Canada Loonie
    1954 Greek Drachma
    Nicaragua 50 Centavos
    Cinemark Cat token
    2005-D O! The Joy! Lewis and Clark nickel
    2 quarters
    4 dimes
    1 copper cent
    6 zinc cents
    3V Button Cell

    A few days before I got two, gooey, stuck together pennies (which is far more common).

    I’d guess there’s about a 5-10% chance of finding something

  8. Just Another Dave In Pa says

    I’m looking forward to 2018. Rocks and birds and trees and water are profoundly simple -even elegant- such that every person can relate to them.

    Great designs for 2018.

    My favorite State Quarter was that glorious Charter Oak Tree in Connecticut. I’d like to see more trees.

    With little of interest aside from Queen’s Beasts, I might get more pucks than usual in 2018.

  9. Jerry Diekmannn says

    Just Another Dave – I have to agree with you – the Connecticut coin was the best of all the state quarters. There is also a 1935 commemorative half dollar (also a beautiful coin) showing the Charter Oak on the obverse and an Art Deco eagle on the reverse. Probably the best designed coin of the classic commemoratives except for the Oregon Trial coins, which were issued during the years 1926 to 1939, but not all years. Of course, how could you go wrong with a coin with one side designed by James Earle Fraser and the other side designed by his wife, Laura Gardin Fraser?

  10. Tom P. - MA says

    @cagcrisp past performance does not indicate future results, although you are correct in that most modern gold coinage will revert to bullion prices.

    @so krates I’m very surprised at the British old penny. Even clueless people seem to hold on to the bigger coins. Some days these machines are like a gold mine, other days the back seat of an old car. Unless it’s silver, I’m not going to be the one to unstick things.

  11. Jerry Diekmannn says

    Cagcrisp – another fine and thorough analysis. I think what your work shows is that ALL gold commemoratives from the modern area (1986 to 2017), even the super-stars like the 2009 UHR $20.00 double eagle eventually reach a point where the numismatic value is very little above the bullion value, which will always be the base. The rise in value of gold commemorative coins is based pretty much entirely on the rise in bullion. The same could be said for most of the silver commemorative coins too. There are a few exceptions, but not many.

  12. CasualCollector says

    Off Topic – what happened to the 2017 American Eagle One Ounce Gold Uncirculated (17EH) on the US Mint Site — The last status I saw was SOLD OUT, but over the last few days it looks like it was removed from their site completely???

  13. smalltimecollector says

    Off Topic – Visited the us mint site (https://catalog.usmint.gov/) and call me jaded. I’ve been a collector since the 1960’s and I cannot wrap my thoughts around the mints offerings. One need only look at the offerings pictured there. It might represent an assortment of interests to bring in new customers. There are few items that attract to me (and others). THe most interesting are long gone or were sold through bullion hawks (palladium, to wit). This may be the reason the mint is seeing interest waning?
    Good coins become un-obtainable while the mundane (to collectors) languish. It’s not about creating collectibles. There is companies that cater to that segment. Make coins, not special interest trinkets and they will sell.

  14. Numismatrix says

    Tom P : I’m very surprised at the British old penny . . .

    This reminds me of the time I picked up a roll of Dollar coins
    from the local CU to look for the Presidential coins I needed
    for the collection. There was an old Irish 2p coin – the exact same
    size as the dollar in the roll. I called up the CU to get my missing
    dollar and was told – not at all ! So I kept the 2p coin in my car
    as a “lucky” 2 penny, and yes – it has provided accordingly !

  15. Buzz Killington says

    @SK —

    If Nathan For You can have a 57th HS Graduation Reunion, why can’t we celebrate the 242nd Anniversary of something in the same ironic, hidden motive sort of way?

  16. Buddy says

    The 2009 UHR has gone thru two promotions and large price rises and falls since it was released. So, at times it has actually been a very good investment, in fact better than spot — the key is knowing when to sell.

  17. John Q. Coinage says

    Cagcrisp great review/anaklysis & to socrates love the coinstar, how do some people pay 11% to count their money & leave a sheetload behind. I got about $20 in mixed change dolllars in the reject tray plus many euros…..it filled up 3 fingers of a quart baggie for you ‘old’ schoolers….where I know to go……free $$ plus like 4 ag dimes & a walker, all for looking down…….love the coinsart & no more 100% credit for Home Depot or Kroger cards a scam……

  18. John Q. Coinage says

    Rick, maybe, maybe not, try AMPEX had the AU Walkr for like 620 & SLQ I got @ 372….all OGP & decent maybenot a 70 but you cant beat the price… the mint as lost it’s way long ago….

  19. firststarman says

    Please Help.
    I know this is a question out of the blue, but it is related in that it is about coin sets purchased from the US Mint. Back in 20012, 13, and 14 I purchased one Limited Edition Silver Proof Set each year. The coins are encased in a plastic case similar to the regular proof sets (clad and silver) just bigger. All the coins in the LESPS sets are toning. None of the regular proof sets (clad or silver) are toning. They are all kept in a controlled, cool and dry environment. Why are the LESPS sets toning and the others are not? Is this the reason the mint, in 2016, stopped issuing the LESPS sets in the large type of case and started placing the individual coins in individual air tight holders? Has anyone noticed the same?
    Thank you,
    firststarman

  20. Joe M. says

    @ firststarman
    My 2012 LESPS sets did the same thing. I never bought the other years…until this year.
    🙂

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