Annual Uncirculated Dollar Coin Sets Available December 14 for $49.95

2016-annual-unc-dollar-set-coins

The Mint has updated its product page for the 2016 Annual Uncirculated Dollar Coin Set, adding the price ($49.95), description, and images.

As in previous years, the set includes one each of the year’s Presidential $1 coins (Nixon, Ford, and Reagan), a Native American $1 coin, and an American Eagle one-ounce silver Uncirculated coin. This year, however, the set is light a dollar, as the Presidential series has concluded with three, rather than the usual four, annual coins.

The reduced number of coins might make the price increase (last year’s set was $46.95, as of October 31) seem a bit much, but silver is currently about $1 per ounce more expensive than it was at that time, when it was $15.60. The individual cost of the manganese-brass dollars is unchanged: about $1.32 apiece, if purchased in 25-coin rolls. Thus:

Coins Purchased Separately

Price of Set
  Cost per $1 Coin No. of $1 Coins Total Cost, $1 Coins Cost of Unc. Silver Eagle

Total

2015

$1.32

5

$6.60

$39.95

$46.55

$46.95

2016

$1.32

4

$5.28

$44.95

$50.23

$49.95

(Obviously, it’s possible to bring the cost of the individual dollars down to $1.10 by purchasing a 250-coin bag; these figures assume the average collector would either buy in rolls or purchase single coins, at a markup, from dealers who buy in bags.)

The Annual Uncirculated Dollar Coin Set isn’t the most exciting Mint product, but for many collectors it’s an annual tradition. And in this case, it marks the end of a series of sets that commenced in 2007. Since these sets don’t command much of a premium in their original jackets on ebay (at least, those prior to the drastic mintage reductions in 2012), here’s a product idea for the manufacturers out there: a nice 2007–2016 album with one page for each year. Maybe add a window in the cover for a Proof 2016 anniversary ASE, with lettered-edge visibility.  ❑


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Comments

  1. Old Big Bird says

    A while back I asked about an American Eagle burnished. I believe someone wrote back that it was in the $1 Uncirculated dollar set. Well the Us Mint finally released it’s information and it does not mention that the American Eagle is in burnished finish?

  2. cagcrisp says

    I would have to agree with IPS_STUFF on this fact. What is the rush? Gold has been in a Bear market since 2012 and with the exception of a couple of reasons in 2016 that now Appear to have abated to some extent, it appears more of the same…

  3. says

    @Old Bid Bird…the Silver eagle in the Uncirculated Set has the “W” Mint mark…so it is the burnished version and thus the 30th Anniversary version.

    If you don’t think that is correct….call the Mint and ask.

  4. says

    You can buy a “P” Roosevelt NGC SP69 First Day of issue or PCGS SP69 First Day of issue in the $130- $139 range in most recent sells…some have been higher, but 90% are in that range.

    I prefer that over the ogp…costs less, easier to display…just my opinion.

  5. RSF says

    MNB – Your idea of an album is a good one for a display of these sets. It’s a shame it would be limited to just 7 pages as there were no sets issued for years 2009, 2010, and 2011. I guess they could have pages for those years with holes to be filled with similar issued coins.

  6. Old Big Bird says

    @-Steve Thanks for your input. It is just strange that the Mint Site does not mentioned burnished

  7. bigguy says

    if you read the mint site it says unc dollar from west point ,so it has to be a burnished dollar,that is where they are minted

  8. Sith says

    Just for clarification ‘And in this case, it marks the end of a series of sets that commenced in 2007. ” I assume that the mint will stop making them as the presidential dollars series is at an end

  9. Mint News Blog says

    @bigguy — I just checked the Mint’s press release, which says they are, indeed, “struck on burnished blanks.” I’m surprised this hasn’t been part of the website copy, as it tends to be a selling point.

    — Diana

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