Designs for 2012 Star Spangled Banner Silver Dollar and Gold Coin

Earlier this week, the United States Mint announced the designs for the 2012 Star Spangled Banner Commemorative Coins. The program includes a $5 gold coin with a maximum mintage of 100,000 and silver dollars with a maximum mintage of 500,000.

Under the authorizing legislation, the designs are to be emblematic of the War of 1812, particularly the Battle of Baltimore that formed the basis for the lyrics of the Star Spangled Banner. This became the official national anthem of the United States by congressional resolution on March 3, 1931.

The US Mint initially provided ten obverse and eight reverse design candidates for the $5 gold coin, and six obverse and nine reverse design candidates for the silver dollar. These were reviewed by the  Maryland War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission, Commission of Fine Arts (CFA), and Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC). The final design selections were made by the Secretary of the Treasury.

The review by the CCAC had taken an unusual tract. Rather than considering the design candidates for the coins specifically indicated by the US Mint, the committee reviewed all sixteen obverse and all seventeen reverse designs together, before identifying designs for each coin respectively. They gave consideration to the designs that would produce well based on the sizes of the coins, and obverse and reverse designs that would compliment each other.

Below are the official design selections as well as information on the recommendations made by the CFA and CCAC. Comprehensive coverage of the recommendations and images of all design candidates can be seen here for the CFA and here for the CCAC.

The Star Spangled Banner $5 Gold Coin obverse depicts a naval battle scene from the War of 1812. An American ship appears in the foreground, while a damaged and fleeing British ship appears in the background. The reverse design features the opening words of the Star Spangled Banner against a background of fifteen stripes and fifteen stars. The obverse wad designed by Donna Weaver and sculpted by Joseph Menna, while the reverse was designed by Richard Masters and sculpted by Joseph Menna.

The CCAC had recommended the same obverse design that was chosen. This was initially identified by the US Mint as one of the design candidates for the silver dollar. The CCAC recommended a different design for the reverse, which included flags with fifteen stars and fifty stars shown together.

The CFA had recommended the obverse design that was actually chosen for the silver dollar. For the reverse they had recommended a design featuring an abstraction of the flag with the words “O Say Does That Star Spangled Banner Yet Wave”.

The obverse of the Star Spangled Banner Silver Dollar features a depiction of Liberty waving a flag with fifteen stars and fifteen stripes. Fort McHenry appears in the background. The reverse design depicts a waving modern American flag. The obverse was designed by Joel Iskowitz and sculpted by Phebe Hemphill, while the reverse was designed by William C. Burgard II and sculpted by Don Everhart.

The CCAC had recommended the same obverse design that was chosen. Initially, this had been identified by the US Mint as one of the design candidates for the gold coin. The CCAC also recommended the same reverse design that was chosen. Members of the committee felt that this obverse and reverse pairing “would convey a message about the endurance of the Republic and the of the flag from the time of the War of 1812 to the present.”

The CFA had recommended an obverse design featuring a large image of a ship with the inscription “Privateers in the War of 1812” based on the high quality of the drawing. They had recommended the same reverse design that was chosen by the Treasury Secretary.

The release date for the Star Spangled Banner Commemorative Coins has not yet been announced by the United States Mint. Under the authorizing legislation, the coins may be offered only during the calendar year beginning January 1, 2012.

The release date for the other commemorative program for the coming year, the Infantry Solider Silver Dollar, has recently been indicated as February 12, 2012.

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Comments

  1. Egger says

    Some one should tell the mint edge lettering would make these better for the reverse sides, taking the text off the reverse

  2. Tom says

    The gold coin design isn’t very good it’s pretty basic, they should have shown Fort McHenry in the background with some cannon volleys and rockets.
    The silver coin looks really nice though. Great design.
    I look forward to buying a silver one.

  3. Hawk says

    I like the silver dollar design as well. I’m not a fan of the reverse of the $5 gold coin, I’m not getting the stars and stripes presented in such a way. I don’t mind the opening line words though.

  4. J A says

    I like the designs but I feel the the reverse of the gold coin is the one that isn’t so attractive, Perhaps it’s the text font. I’m not sure.

  5. says

    @Tom: I agree with the silver obverse. I think that’s the best of the four. But the reverse, while not quite as bad as the Lincoln “Word Art Fun” reverse of 2009, is reminiscent. Looks like they found a better clip art this time, though.

  6. simon says

    Mint Schedule Update for the 5 Oz’ers for those who are still in the loop.

    February 2011 America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins™ – Vicksburg National Military Park
    February 2011 America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins™ – Chickasaw National Recreation Area

  7. Robertzon says

    That’s right. The writing on the $5 gold reverse is not a font. I read the official coin’s description and the designer copied Francis Scott Key’s handwriting from the original manuscript of the poem he wrote that famous night.

    I think it will look pretty neat in Proof because the “O Say Can You See” inscription will be incused, contrasting with the striped background. Very nice indeed.

    The silver obverse is a nice design, too, but frankly, I’m getting tired of all the full figured obverse designs we’ve been getting lately on these commemorative issues.

  8. tbrokmeier says

    Wow…. these designs are absolutely pathetic!!

    I can see that I will NOT be buying any of these ugly Coins!! So sad….

  9. Matt L. DeTectre says

    I’ve got to wait and see where the prices end up. They way things have been goin’ the silver ones mignt end up knockin’ on the 80 dolla door. Sure metal is slightly down now but I don’t see it staying down or for that matter even goin’ much lower. Hey, but if silver takes a big dump and mint prices match, I’m in.

    Why did God invent economists?
    I don’t know but they sure do make weather forecasters look good.

  10. says

    The obverse of the silver coin is excellent and I think it will look good.

    As for the gold coin, I think I will wait for photos before rendering judgment. I’m not quite sure how that writing will turn out on the proof and uncirculated coins.

  11. fosnock says

    Matt – Maybe you should read Austrian Economics. They are very accurate.

    My 2 cents – As far as the coins I will pass on them I got too many coins this year and plan on getting the 2012 ATB bullion and if the mint can get them out before silver rises a few of the un-circulated ATBs, The silver coins obverse looks nice, but not nice enough to entice me to buy it.

  12. Matt L. DeTectre says

    fosnock: Hey, I’m with ya. I should have said Keynesian, government, or mainstream tv economists make weather forecasters look good. I think those three are all pretty much the same.

  13. fosnock says

    Matt – Just checking about the economists :-)…I’m with you on the coins. Silver is so low right now I would get anything the mint is offering but the mint has nothing. You just know the mint is hording silver and will release their products once it reaches a much higher price…just like they did for the 2010 silver products (most notably the ATB bullion)

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