United States Mint 2014 Birth, Happy Birthday, and Congratulations Sets

Tomorrow, January 14, 2014 at 12:00 Noon ET, the United States Mint will begin sales for a trio of special occasion sets. This includes the 2014 Birth, Happy Birthday, and Congratulations Sets.

These special occasion sets are likely released in January in order to be available for gift giving occasions throughout the year. They may attract some added attention since the sets will represent the first appearance of several 2014-dated coins including the 2014 Proof Silver Eagle.

2014 Birth Set

The 2014 Birth Set is intended to serve as a gift to mark the arrival of a newborn. Each set includes the following five proof coins struck at the San Francisco Mint and carrying the “S” mint mark:

  • 2014-S Proof Lincoln Cent
  • 2014-S Proof Jefferson Nickel
  • 2014-S Proof Roosevelt Dime
  • 2014-S Proof Great Smoky Mountains National Park Quarter
  • 2014-S Proof Kennedy Half Dollar

The 2014 Birth Set (along with the simultaneously released 2014 Happy Birthday Set) will mark the first appearance of four coins. The 2014-dated proof cent, nickel, dime, and half dollar have not yet been released within any other products.

All five coins of the set are mounted in an illustrated folder which includes spaces for a welcome message, the date/time of birth, length/width of the baby, a photograph, and a lock of the baby’s hair. A certificate of authenticity and coin specification information are included an outer sleeve.

The product is priced at $19.95, with no product or household ordering limits imposed. The US Mint has previously offered Birth Sets in 2012 and 2013, which have sold 47,864 and 34,763 units to date. repectively. Both products still remain available for sale.

2014 Happy Birthday Set

The 2014 Happy Birthday Set is targeted as a numismatic gift for a birthday. Each set includes the following five proof coins struck at the San Francisco Mint and carrying the “S” mint mark:

  • 2014-S Proof Lincoln Cent
  • 2014-S Proof Jefferson Nickel
  • 2014-S Proof Roosevelt Dime
  • 2014-S Proof Everglades National Park Quarter
  • 2014-S Proof Kennedy Half Dollar

These coins are the same as the previous set with the exception of the quarter. For the former set, the first design release of the year is included, while this set contains the final design of the year.

Together with the previous set, this represents the first availability of the 2014-dated proof cent, nickel, dime, and half dollar. These four coins will not be available within another product until the release of the full annual 2014 Proof Set on March 25, 2014.

The 2014 Happy Birthday Set features packaging illustrated with images of gift boxes and balloons, with a space for a personalized message. Priced at $19.95, there are no product or household ordering limits imposed.

The US Mint introduced the Happy Birthday Set last year. The 2013-dated set has sold 9,876 units and remains available for sale.

2014 Congratulations Set

The 2014 Congratulations Set can celebrate any occasion, including weddings, anniversaries, retirements, graduations, or milestone birthdays.

Each set includes one 2014 Proof American Silver Eagle struck at the West Point Mint and carrying the “W” mint mark. The coin is mounted in a folder including images of gold and silver ribbons with a space for a personalized message. The back of the folder includes a certificate of authenticity and coin specifications.

The set is priced at $54.95 with no product or household ordering limits imposed.

This product may see some added interest as an early release of the eagerly anticipated 2014 Proof Silver Eagle. The individual proof coin in standard packaging is scheduled to be released on January 23, 2014 and will be priced at $52.95.

The US Mint introduced the Congratulations Set last year. The 2013-dated set has reached sales of 15,366 and still remains available for sale.

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Comments

  1. stephen m says

    VA Bob, The presses won’t stop. They will only speed up and or slow down. That’s what i mean by calling it “fine tuning the economy”. More money printed or less printed. It depends on what the Fed thinks the economy needs. I read that Japan has been doing it like this for a number of years.

  2. thePhelps says

    stephen – yeah Japan has been and it isn’t doing a lot of good there either.

    I am no fan of printing money from nothing and saying it is a good thing. In the long run – having nearly 18 trillion in debt is not good for anything – unless you are the person the money is owed to. The only reason this is working is because interest rates are so low the debt ratio isn’t getting terribly out of hand. It will and there will be hell to pay.

  3. MarkInFlorida says

    jhawk92, I had bought a bunch of barber stuff at near melt and just pulled the 2004 and 2009s for my kids, and got those common date Indian pennies and V nickels at coins shows cheap. The gold ones were just common ones at close to melt too. I want to leave something special for each one.
    FMT there is a club of collectors of counterfeit bust halves. They are probably rarer than real ones!

  4. Jerry Diekmann says

    Dave is exactly right about the rounding if the penny were eliminated. Rounding up to the nearest 5 cents or 10 cents (if the nickel were also eliminated) results in a zero sum game – the rounding downs offset the rounding ups. believing that everything will always be rounded up is like drinking Kool Aid – wrong to do or believe.

  5. Jerry Diekmann says

    For those of you interested in building a “classic set” of US coins, I would recommend getting a type set of 20th century coins in MS63 or MS64 condition – either raw or slabbed, as you prefer – I myself prefer raw. This would give you an Indian Head cent, the three Barber coins, Morgan dollar, and the beautiful coins that came to be from 1913 to 1921 – Buffalo nickel, Winged Liberty Head dime, Standing Liberty quarter, Walking Liberty half dollar, Peace dollar, and Franklin half dollar, plus the dead President coins we still have in circulation. If you wanted to, you could add the varieties – two different Buffalo nickels in 1913, two different SL quarters in 1917, recessed date for SL quarters starting in 1925, and silver war nickels. You could improve the set by picking several coins with mint marks, but skip the 1917 Walking Liberty half dollars as they are too mexpensive for the average collector. Or just collect what you like! But I would strive to make sure that all the coins you do collect are MS63 or MS64. They stand a much better chance of increrasing in value over time than the circulated coins. In any case, beware of overgraded coins. I see many overgraded coins both raw and in slabs. Go for eye appeal!

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