United States Mint begins sales of 2018 WWI Commemorative Silver Dollar and Companion Medal Sets on January 17

Washington — The United States Mint will open sales for the 2018 World War I Centennial Silver Dollar and the World War I Centennial Silver Dollar and Medal Sets on January 17 at noon Eastern Time. Product information is below:

Product Option Product Code Intro. Price Reg. Price
Proof 18CA $51.95 $56.95
Uncirculated 18CB $48.95 $53.95
Army Special Set Coin & Medal 18CC N/A $99.95
Air Service Special Set Coin & Medal 18CD N/A $99.95
Marine Corps Special Set Coin & Medal 18CN N/A $99.95
Navy Special Set Coin & Medal 18CM N/A $99.95
Coast Guard Special Set Coin & Medal 18CP N/A $99.95

The introductory sales period ends on February 20, 2018, at 3 p.m. ET, when regular pricing takes effect. Product descriptions are below.

World War I Centennial Silver Dollar

Hover to zoom.

The obverse (heads), titled “Soldier’s Charge,” depicts an almost stone-like soldier gripping a rifle. Barbed wire twines are featured in the lower right-hand side of the design. Inscriptions are LIBERTY, 1918, 2018, and IN GOD WE TRUST.

The wire design element continues onto the reverse (tails), titled “Poppies in the Wire,” which features abstract poppies mixed in with barbed wire. Inscriptions include ONE DOLLAR, E PLURIBUS UNUM, and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Public Law 113-212 authorizes the bureau to mint and issue up to 350,000 silver dollar coins. Customer demand will determine the ratio of Proof to Uncirculated coins minted within the authorized mintage limits.

The price of each coin includes a $10 surcharge, which the law authorizes to be paid to the United States Foundation for the Commemoration of the World Wars, to assist the World War I Centennial Commission in commemorating the centenary of World War I.


In support of the coin program, the Mint has created special companion medals honoring each of the branches of the U.S. Armed Forces that were active during the War. Each World War I Centennial Silver Dollar and Medal Set includes a Proof silver dollar and a Proof 90 percent silver World War I Centennial Medal. The medals are available only in these sets. Medal descriptions are as follows:

World War I Centennial Army Medal — West Point Mint

The obverse depicts a soldier cutting through German barbed wire, while a second soldier aims a rifle amid a shattered landscape of broken trees and cratered earth. A shell explodes in the distance.

The reverse features the United States Army emblem, which was also in use during World War I, with the inscriptions OVER THERE!, CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I, 2018, and UNITED STATES ARMY.

World War I Centennial Marine Corps Medal — San Francisco Mint

The obverse depicts the aftermath of the Battle of Belleau Wood. One Marine stands guard as the other kneels to pay respect to the fallen. The inscription quotes a report to the American Expeditionary Forces: WOODS NOW U.S. MARINE CORPS ENTIRELY.

The reverse features the World War I-era version of the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor emblem with the inscriptions CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I, 2018, OVER THERE!, and BATTLE OF BELLEAU WOOD.

World War I Centennial Navy Medal — Philadelphia Mint


The obverse depicts a U.S. Navy destroyer on escort duty after deploying a depth charge in defense of a convoy. Above the destroyer, kite balloons provide Navy personnel a platform to spot submarines and other dangers. The inscription OVER THERE!, appears at the bottom of the design.

The reverse features an Officer’s Cap Device* used in World War I. Inscriptions are UNITED STATES NAVY, 2018, and CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I. (*Note: An official, uniform seal of the United States Navy had not been adopted at the time of World War I.)

World War I Centennial Air Service Medal — Denver Mint


The obverse depicts the iconic SPAD XIII, a World War I fighter flown by many Americans and valued for its speed, strength, and firepower, viewed from the top and side. The inscription SPAD XIII identifies the aircraft.

The reverse design features the Military Aviator Insignia with the inscriptions CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I, 2018, OVER THERE!, AIR SERVICE, and AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES.

World War I Centennial Coast Guard Medal — Philadelphia Mint


The obverse depicts a lifeboat from the Coast Guard Cutter USCGC Seneca heading out in heavy seas toward the torpedoed steamship Wellington.

The reverse features the World War I-era Coast Guard emblem, with the inscriptions CENTENNIAL OF WORLD WAR I2018, and OVER THERE!

The coin and medal sets are limited to 100,000 units across all five product options and can be ordered only between noon on January 17, 2018, and 3 p.m. on February 20, unless the limit is reached prior to that date. Production will be limited to the orders received within this window. Fulfillment of these sets will begin in late May 2018.

Orders will be accepted at the Mint’s online catalog and at 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). Hearing- and speech-impaired customers with TTY equipment may order by calling 1-888-321-MINT (6468). Information on shipping options is available here.

About the United States Mint
The United States Mint was created by Congress in 1792 and became part of the Department of the Treasury in 1873. It is the Nation’s sole manufacturer of legal tender coinage and is responsible for producing circulating coinage for the Nation to conduct its trade and commerce. The United States Mint also produces numismatic products, including Proof, Uncirculated, and commemorative coins; Congressional Gold Medals; and silver and gold bullion coins. The United States Mint’s numismatic programs are self-sustaining and operate at no cost to the taxpayer.

Note: To ensure that all members of the public have fair and equal access to United States Mint products, orders placed prior to the official on-sale date and time of January 17, 2018, noon ET, will not be deemed accepted by the United States Mint and will not be honored.

Press release courtesy of the United States Mint.

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Comments

  1. earthling says

    If the Mint would accept bitcoin , all this stuff would sell in 8.9 minutes. But as it is, this stuff will linger for at least 7 hours.
    💩

  2. Jerry Diekmann says

    An ugly and over-priced products which I will not buy, and I usually buy commemorative coins. Any one of the medals would have looked better than the obverse of this poorly designed coin, IMO. The idea od having to buy this coin to obtain a superior looking medal is a real turnoff on this product. I would be surprised if this coin or any of the medals reach a sellout.

  3. Tinto says

    The Breast Cancer Awareness $5 looks so much better than that WWI $1 coin with the self portrait of the artist on it ..

  4. Anthony says

    The World War I Centennial dollar is a very fitting tribute to the gritty “doughboys” who fought in the Great War. I like the rough hewn depiction of the soldier and the well executed textural effects. The WWI medal series is magnificent! Each of the 5 different sets should sell very fast as they cover the branches of the armed services although I would doubt that very few collectors will want to pay the hefty price tag to obtain all 5 sets.

  5. cagcrisp says

    The $5 Pink Gold Breast Cancer…

    Higher and Higher Prices, Lower and Lower Mintages and More and More Gimmicks…

    Higher and Higher Prices…Check

    No Idea what the price of the $5 Pink Gold Breast Cancer coin will be, however, IF the Mint used the latest pricing used for Boys Town Gold and with the Current Spot price of Gold ~ $1,337.40 you will receive ~ $17.97 Less Gold in the $5 Pink Gold Breast Cancer coin vs. the lowly Boys Town $5 Gold.

    Lower and Lower Mintages…Check

    For the amount of Gold in the $5 Pink Gold Breast Cancer coin ~ .22844 oz. Gold this will be the Lowest Mintage coin for that amount of Gold the Mint has ever Issued (Also the Highest Mintage coin for that amount of Gold because the Mint has never done a Gold coin with that specific amount of Gold)

    More and More Gimmicks…Check

    First and Only Pink Gold coin the Mint has ever issued. First and Only Gold coin with ~ .22844 oz. of Gold…

  6. cagcrisp says

    I’m Hoping that when the $5 Pink Gold Breast Cancer coin come out that:

    1. Gold will be in the $1,350.00-$1,399.99 range
    2. The Mint Sells Out ALL 50,000 Gold coins

    Why?
    At the current Grid pricing of $1,350.00 the Mint will receive Revenue of $22,095,000 which they Direly Need (So they will Not have to raise prices on things that Truely matter)…

    …And Anyone that is willing to pay $441.90 for a Pink Gold Low Mintage Wonder that is worth $308.39 in Gold is a Match made in Heaven…A Perfect Relationship…

    …As other say “Buy what you Like”…The Mint needs to Sell it to you and you need to buy it…

  7. cagcrisp says

    IF you Think you have Copper spotting on the Current Gold commemorative coins….Just Wait until you have 14.8% Copper and a Few years have passed…

  8. KCSO says

    cagcrisp says
    JANUARY 13, 2018 AT 10:03 AM

    “IF you Think you have Copper spotting on the Current Gold commemorative coins….Just Wait until you have 14.8% Copper and a Few years have passed…”

    Ha! Give it 3 months in a PCGS holder!

    Wasted numismatic gold that you can’t offload for less than spot –

    Check!

  9. KCSO says

    WWI Commemorative Medals –

    So.., if I buy my U.S. Navy WWI Comm set in January, when does my credit card get charged?

    Am I expected to carry that expense until the product deliveres in late-May, or June?

    Nice!

    I don’t think the crew at HQ down on 801 9th St NW has thought that, among many things regarding this release, through.

    The U.S. Mint – redefining customer management relationships best practices, … day by day.

  10. KCSO says

    Actually, I would like to acquire all 5 medals, and had planned to do so.

    Making the medals hostage to the $1 Comm is ludicrous.

    There’s 4 that I really want, so the question becomes:

    How much of a loss am I willing to take on a sale of a $1 Comm?

    What does the loss of 4 $1 Comms look like?

    Who wants a $1 Comm in a medal set packaging without the medal?

    To which, I have no answers to.., therefore, I’ll get one set and be on my merry way,

    Buffoonery! 2018 is getting of to a great start with the USM!

  11. Daveinswfl says

    I would hope that that would not happen.
    This is actually the first coin (U.S.) in a while that I find attractive . The frosting looks pretty cool.
    I would guess that there will be a ton of survivors families who will pony up the big bucks for this coin. It is one that I can see being used in jewelry. Any jewelers out there who can speak to the effects of cleaning on this coin in a jewelry application ?

  12. KCSO says

    Larry says
    JANUARY 13, 2018 AT 12:07 AM

    “Slight correction on the mintage, 50K is the combined proof and unc. This will go fast!“

    Larry, many may view this as another BHOF gold in the making THAN buying for the “unique first” experience and for buy and hold,

    If the former plays out, and you know the dealers will be on this like white on rice, the demand ultimately must be there on the backside, and its an entirely different market than it is from 2014.

    I’d buy for the right reasons on this one, and not get overly enthusiastic my friend, the wrong sort of first day type of demand may show up, which would actually benefit though that wait patiently on the side lines, for the right opportunity.

    I’ll have to side with Cag, I think he’s dead on the money that this one is going to come with a ‘perky’premium.

  13. Mattarch says

    I would like some opinions on what the secondary market prices will be for the WWI medals later this year. I would like to have the medals but not the WWI commemorative coin. I assume there will be people sending in the medals for third party grading so they can sell a MS70. What will the ‘rejected’ medals that are only graded 69 cost? I would like to have one of those.

  14. Larry says

    @ KSCO – I am one of those “buy what you like” guys. I figure if I really like a coin, others will too and if I need to sell someday I will at least break even. Or maybe lose a little, which is the price I am willing to pay to enjoy a coin. Coin World also has a picture of the reverse, which I can’t show here, but I think it is one of the better reverses they have done. If you haven’t seen it, it is a big butterfly, which I think is pretty cool. Yes, it is kind of like the BHOF coins, but I still have my silver proof of that one and it isn’t going anywhere.
    This coin will probably sell out instantly because of the mintage and because of the subject of the coin.

  15. Rick Brough says

    I like the design of the commemorative coin. In particular, the placement of “In God We Trust” directly in front of the charging soldiers face is perfect.

  16. Buzz Killington says

    One of the many things I have learned from @cagcrisp in the past bunch of years is that the flippability of the pink gold does not depend on the mintage, it depends on the Household Limit.

    I am too lazy to check if the Truman reverse proof dollar is still carrying its premium.

  17. Tinto says

    @KCSO
    ” ..I don’t think the crew at HQ down on 801 9th St NW has thought that, among many things regarding this release, through. ..”

    Nope .. and this WWI coin is their crowning achievement … with everything off on this coin the soldier doesn’t even seem to have his eyes open .. so he’s just gonna go blindly stumbling into a field full of barbed wire and other obstacles like bomb craters and enemy soldiers with ready bayonets . . neat …

  18. Barry says

    If I remember correctly the HH limit on the BHOF gold coins was 10. Maybe they should put a limit of 2 or 4 per HH to a least provide a chance for more people to order.

  19. Einbahnstrasse says

    Cag, where did you get the gold content of the pink coin? I still haven’t seen any official confirmation of the coin’s overall weight–some people are assuming it’ll be a standard-weight $5 with less gold, and others are assuming it’ll have the standard gold content with a larger total weight. Do you have any official information on this, or are you just calculating based on an assumption of standard weight?

  20. MarkInFlorida says

    I was also curious about the Truman reverse proofs since I still have mine and wouldn’t mind selling, and lately on the Bay they’ve gotten $280-$299. A dealer offered me $160 each at the last show I went to.

  21. cagcrisp says

    @Einbahnstrasse”, where did you get the gold content of the pink coin? I still haven’t seen any official confirmation of the coin’s overall weight–some people are assuming it’ll be a standard-weight $5 with less gold, and others are assuming it’ll have the standard gold content with a larger total weight. Do you have any official information on this, or are you just calculating based on an assumption of standard weight?”

    I read the Law that was enacted for All the coins.

    Specifically for the Gold “.85 inches”. That’s standard size for the Gold commemorate coins and I made the Assumption the Mint wouldn’t do a one off on changing the Height

    You go from 90% Gold to 85% Gold and that’s how I arrived at the Gold content…

  22. MarkInFlorida says

    The platinum proof coming out next month has a mintage limit of 20,000! The only 1 oz platinum proof they ever sold over 20,000 of was the first one in 1997. In the last 15 years they only once sold over 10,000. And with a household limit of 1, they’ll be sure no one can buy one for each of their children.

  23. smalltimecollector says

    Does the image of the breast cancer awareness $5 remind anyone of the kids collectible/game piece of the 90’s called pogs?

  24. KCSO says

    Steve says
    JANUARY 13, 2018 AT 8:11 PM

    “Also, the breakdown of the 50,000 sold was approximately 32k proof, 18k unc”

    And given we’re looking at the likely same % split, perhaps 80/20 – you know HSN Mike will do his darnedest to buy up to 50% of those.

    If the USM is rolling out a HHL of 1 for the APE, perhaps we’ll see a HHL of 1 or 2 for the BCA for the first 24 hours, if you want one, I wouldn’t screw around.

    I like that jewelry idea, that’s brilliant. Not sure how that Cu content would ‘wear’ over time, though either on a bracelet or neckless, that has a lot of secondary resale value to those that do not collect coins, or to be pawned off by HSN Mike, though he doesn’t care how it wears after it leaves his hands

  25. KCSO says

    MarkInFlorida – I just assumed that the HHL would be lifted within 24 hours as we saw in 2017(?)

    At 20,000.., that puppy will be around to 2019, even if they initially struck 10,000 on the first go, I suspect.

    For 2018 – APE is Out, Pd Proof is In

    I hope that they bring upwards of 20,000 of the Pd Proof to the table, we’re gonna need it and then some luck.

  26. cagcrisp says

    As far as the dimension and Gold content in the upcoming $5 Pink Gold Breast Cancer Coin…

    The First $1 Gold coin I purchased was an 1850 Type 1. Gold content .0483 oz.

    The Second $1 Gold coin I purchased was an 1854 Type 2. Gold content .0483 oz.

    After receiving the First, I Assumed that with same Gold content that the 2 coins would be the same size.

    Wrong.

    The diameter of the $1 Gold 1850 was 13 mm and the diameter of the $1 Gold 1854 was 15 mm

    IF you’ve ever held/seen a $1 Gold Type 1 you will see where after 1853 that never made Any coin that small again.

    The standard Dime is 18 mm; making the Dime 38% larger in diameter than the $1 Gold Type 1

  27. cagcrisp says

    Final mintage of the BHOF Gold coins was 32,427 Proof and 17,677 Uncirculated.

    Total coins 50,104

    The last time we had a SO on a Gold commemorative coin and the only time I can remember the Mint sold More than they legally were authorized to sell…

  28. Joe M. says

    So……
    The platinum series chosen is…..
    “Set 07 and Set 07A portray Liberty planting seed for future sustenance, lighting the way westward, and harvesting the well worked crops. The inscriptions “Life,” “Liberty,” and “Happiness” are likenesses of the handwritten words from the Declaration of Independence.”
    ^ I’m basing this upon the first choice the mint is scheduled to release. Are the 2019 and 2020 designs also in set 7 and 7A??
    If so…
    Well, the mint lost more money from me….
    had they chosen sets…
    “Set 05 and Set 06 depict allegorical figures in beautiful landscape settings. The sun and star, used throughout, represent hope, destiny and the potential for happiness.”…
    I would’ve bought all three years in a row!!(probably two!!)

    I was going to buy the Marine Corps medal of this set, but I’ll pick it up on the bay in a PCGS PF70 instead, since you have to buy the fugly dollar too from the mint 🙁

  29. Tinto says

    @Joe M.

    And I read on another blog’s archive that the CCAC had recommended that the sword be removed from Liberty’s hip from design 7, …. so I guess they chose design 7 … and that it be paired with reverse design 9 which the Mint uses (dunno if the blogs publish anymore the CCAC meeting results with snippets of their comments and recommendations …) oh well, glad I went for the Preamble series .. no regrets there .. and I sent them to PCGS since I am trying to clear up stuff before I get too old for it …

  30. Joe M. says

    @ Tinto
    I wonder what the voting was like…hmmmmm. I WOULD’VE LOVED TO HAVE BEEN A FLY ON THAT WALL 🙂
    I would’ve liked 9 & 10 too, but I guess the mint is going in a direction that appeases “politically-correct” minds, not BEAUTIFUL coins that would thrill collectors 🙁
    I’m not saying my choice is better. I’m just saying that the choices of coins over the past few years haven’t been BEAUTIFUL to me. The mint lost about $10,000 from me last year….at the least!

  31. Tinto says

    @Joe M.

    I think I read on Coin World that the Mint will use all 3 of the “#7” obverses … and your comment about babies made me take another look at the designs … and I see that the bag with the seeds is specifically tailored for and worn by the baby … .. would have been better if Liberty was wearing the (larger) bag .. or no bag at all .. IMO

  32. Joseph says

    Definitely will get one. will show to one family member who was a breast cancer survivor.
    For the design, honestly, i really like the French version, esp. the big breast of the French woman on the obverse,LOL.
    btw, will definitely get that one too. lol again.

    Larry says

    January 13, 2018 at 12:05 am

    First picture of the pink gold Breast Cancer Awareness coin. Mintage limit will be 50K. I think this one will sell out quickly. Looks kind of neat to me.
    https://www.coinworld.com/news/us-coins/2018/01/us-mint-strikes-first-pink-gold-commemorative-coin.html#

  33. earthling says

    Is Zimbabwe really getting into the Cryptocurrency game? One of the POTUS Sh*thole Nations trying to get itself out of crisis . I find that to be a commendable effort.

  34. Erik H says

    Joseph, I like the French coin too. I was going to comment on it yesterday but forgot until I saw your post.

  35. Erik H says

    Gold & Silver both up in Asian trading how high will it go during the US holiday hours. Hopefully it will break some key levels so I can make a few buck before the next take down (then rinse & repeat).

  36. Buzz Killington says

    I just noticed these medals are coin silver and silver dollar sized!

    Isn’t it time to modernize and stop using coin silver for non-circulating coins?

    There may be some value in continuity, but plenty of things have changed in the last 100 years. Using pure silver for non-circulating coins and medals should one of them.

  37. NCM Collector says

    I think the coin and medal sets will sell out within the 30 day offering period.
    There is enough buzz.

  38. cagcrisp says

    US Dollar Index is currently at 90.54 that’s Down 1.91% since Year End 2017.

    The US Dollar Index Fell 9.7% for the Entire CY2017.

    15 days Down 1.91% equates to a CY2018 Pace of 46.4% Decline.

    I wouldn’t be Selling any Gold or Silver until you see the dollar stabilize.

    I don’t know how many times I’ve said it, Trump NEEDS a weak dollar to accomplish the things he wants…

  39. Achmed says

    the french silver coins sold at face value are normally the 10 euro coins. And their silver content is .333. I call that copper with addition of silver.

  40. datadave says

    With the baseball proof gold selling for $400 (UNC) and $350 (proof) currently, 50K of the pink gold coin doesn’t look like a good flip opportunity to me.

  41. Buzz Killington says

    @datadave —

    Almost NO flip opportunities are good four years out. You have to strike while the iron is hot.

    People were even flipping the BBHOF silver dollars, back when first came out.

  42. NCM Collector says

    I have concerns that the Mint will not post weekly sales numbers for the coin and medal sets. To quote Star Wars, “I have a bad feeling about this.”

  43. Buzz Killington says

    I wanted to quote Star Wars as to the Mint’s policies, too: “Let the past die; k!ll it, if you have to.”

    I hope they DON’T post sales numbers, to prevent a rash of cancellations or whatever. An honest to goodness $500 lottery.

  44. earthling says

    Buy em BECAUSE you like em. Not because you THINK you can flip em for any profit, now, then, or ever.

    Flipping is a thing of the past.

    Welcome to the new reality of FLOPPING.

    * if you really like em and want them for YOUR collection, maybe catch a flop from some original buyer.

  45. joe#2 says

    You want to FLIP????? FLIP hamburgers… FLIP pancakes… Do a backwards FLIP..
    I think a good deal of folks have FLIPPED out.. 🙁

  46. NCM Collectors says

    I want them. I don’t want to pay full price so I will buy them on the secondary market in a few years. Medals just don’t hold their purchase price in the long haul. September 11 and Wildlife Refuge are two good examples. I’ll most likely complete my mint state commemorative set before I catch up on all the recent silver medals. Only 39 commems left. I can do that in two years.

  47. John Q. Coinage says

    To flip you need a viable collecting base., not profiteers or speculators….the Mint has caused many to sour on collecting & as WE age the # of collectors falls, & MAY accelerate, how many 20’somethings are coin collectors, 30’s ?…….very few! Date collecting has been effected but for the giants of rarity (’93-S $1, 09-S VDB’s, ’55 double dies, still can sell for decent $.. but the folks who collect a ’53=s Washington 25c or a 1935-s cent are diminshing, slowly but surely, and the mint making you buy the gawdful WW1 to get the nice shiny medal = a good marking ply but a sour taste for all the collectors, especially those who have lived thru such BS in the past, sorry to be abummer but “I just do’t care” per Lt. Gerard in the Fugitive…..but a smooth CC $ for you 100’s$ you’ll dump on WW! coins from which you’ll see no prift lest silver goes to $50 & then the dollar is still worth LESS than spot…let THAT sink in…(oh Medals too!)

  48. NCM Collector says

    I want them. I don’t want to pay full price so I will buy them on the secondary market in a few years. Medals just don’t hold their purchase price in the long haul. September 11 and Wildlife Refuge are two good examples. I’ll most likely complete my mint state commemorative set before I catch up on all the recent silver medals. Only 39 commems left. I can do that in two years.

  49. Jerry Diekmann says

    I think I will treat the pink Breast Cancer Awaremess gold coin the same way I treated the Basball Hall of Fame gold coin. Since the obverse and reverse designs are identical to the silver and clad coins, I will just pass up buying the coin. Also, like cagcrisp has said, there is danger of this new gold coin getting copper spots unless the alloy is mixed thoroughly. What about the possibility of a silver (white) spot appearing? For the price of this coin, vs. its bullion value and the danmger of future unsightly spots appearing, the prudent step for me is to pass and not get caught up in the avalanche – I’m pretty sure that the gold coin at least will sell out.

  50. Ralph says

    earthling says: Flipping is a thing of the past.

    So true!
    I believe the whole hobby has changed dramatically over the last 2 years.
    Some of my highlights:
    1. Being involved with Brad in the sell out of the Eleanor Roosevelt Gold Coin.
    2. Finding over 200 – 2014 First Spouse Set’s available one Saturday morning after they had been sold out and were selling for way over $200 . Of course I bought them all.

  51. earthling says

    Ralph

    I find it to be extremely interesting to read about your First Spouse Sets. Congratulations, nice score.

    The big killer of the modern Coins Programs are the Coins themselves and all the distractions for Peoples Money. Bitcoin and all the other Cryptos are taking the crowd completely away.

    For me, my experiences last year with the 2017 Congratulations Set were enough for me. I also doubt I will ever attend another Coin Show ever. It’s all a waste of time.

  52. Ralph says

    earthling says:

    Ralph

    I find it to be extremely interesting to read about your First Spouse Sets. Congratulations, nice score.

    The big killer of the modern Coins Programs are the Coins themselves and all the distractions for Peoples Money. Bitcoin and all the other Cryptos are taking the crowd completely away.

    For me, my experiences last year with the 2017 Congratulations Set were enough for me. I also doubt I will ever attend another Coin Show ever. It’s all a waste of time.

    That was without a doubt my best score.

    You are so correct about this hobby. I got into it right after 2000. I started out buying coins from the Coin Vault on tv. Luckily I gained some knowledge and realized they were way overcharging me.
    Then the beginning of the State Quarter program. The Mint gave a 3 day period to order the current release. After that they were sold out. This is what pushed the early ones way up in price. I can remember a $25 bag of Delaware quarters going for mover $200.

    Re-posting this on the new thread.

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