Yosemite Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins on Waiting List

The US Mint has posted a “waiting list” notice for the 2010-P Yosemite National Park Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coin.
This notice signifies that the United States Mint has received orders to meet the maximum mintage limit for the product. Orders are still being accepting, but they will go on a waiting list, which will be fulfilled on a first come, first served basis in the event that any coins become available due to order cancellations.

Sales figures for the third numismatic release had been trending slower than the previous releases, which makes the apparent sell out an unexpected development.

The Yosemite coin went on sale June 9, 2011. Through the first US Mint sales report on June 12, total sales had reached 20,511 units. In the following week, sales of 2,593 units were recorded to bring the total to 23,104 on June 19. If the waiting list notice is correct, then an additional 3,896 have been sold since that date to reach the maximum mintage of 27,000 coins.

In total, the Yosemite National Park Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins have been available for 14 days before the waiting list notice was posted. This compares to availability of 15 days each for the prior two releases featuring Hot Springs and Yellowstone National Park.

Other News

Yesterday, the US Mint reduced the price of the 2011 Proof Platinum Eagle. Since the start of sales on May 26, 2011, the coins had been priced at $2,092 each. The new price is $1,992 per coin, reflecting an average platinum price within the $1,650 to $1,749.99 range.

Today, the US Mint officially announced the details for the fourth numismatic ATB five ounce silver coin featuring Grand Canyon National Park. Sales will begin on June 29, 2011 at 12:00 Noon ET. The price per coin will remain at $279.95, and the same ordering limit of one coin per household will be imposed.

Details of the 2011 Proof Silver Eagle were also announced. Nothing has changed from the preliminary details provided earlier this month. Sales will begin on June 30, 2011. The coins will be priced at $59.95 each, and an initial ordering limit of 100 coins per household will be in place. There is no maximum mintage limit established.

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Comments

  1. Anonymous says

    Yes, its true. The 2006 proof buff goes for a little over spot. As I recall if you purchased it when it first came out for 800 bucks you have nearly doubled your money in five years. Where else is it that easy to do. Likewise the '06 bullion buff went for 670 when released. The value is still spot but most dealers will give you less than spot. Still a heckuva return in five years. Now having said all that its not the gold that went up but the paper dollar that went down. And I thought I got screwed paying 800 bucks for an '06 buffalo

  2. JimD says

    6/24/11 3:36 pm
    "I know it's not easier to get an SP70 from PCGS than NGC. As stated before, there are only 167 graded SP70 for Hot Springs. That's out of 27,000 minted which is .006% Not a huge number."

    After reading this comment, I about had a fit. Not only is it an example of poor use of statistics, it is also incorrect mathematically.

    First of all, 167 out of 27000 is 0.6%. Think about moving the decimal point when using a calculator to account for the percentage.

    What really bugged me was the fact that you can't make a statement based on one number. The only important number is the ratio of submitted coins to a particular grade. If 1000 were sent in and 167 were 70 then it would be 16.7%, but if only 500 were submitted, the percentage would be 33%.

  3. Anonymous says

    Hot Springs:

    396 SP70 out of 1184 submitted to NGC works out to 33.4%. That's a far cry from 0.6%.

  4. Anonymous says

    do not buy slabbed coins. do not go for slabbed.

    average buying price for modern perfect coins "proof70 or MS70" are around 5% to 10% over buying price of raw coins. and the proof69 or MS69 is 5% to 10% below buying price of raw coins.

    well. the selling price for a perfect coins is always overpriced. and the number of slabbed coins is quite high.

  5. Anonymous says

    What really bugged me was the fact that you can't make a statement based on one number. The only important number is the ratio of submitted coins to a particular grade. If 1000 were sent in and 167 were 70 then it would be 16.7%, but if only 500 were submitted, the percentage would be 33%.

    You are wrong. Math is not an exact science. I have had 2 different calculators give 2 different percentages. In that case the accepted procedure is to use the average of the two values.

  6. Anonymous says

    "Math is not an exact science. I have had 2 different calculators give 2 different percentages. In that case the accepted procedure is to use the average of the two values."

    An exact science is any field of science capable of accurate quantitative expression or precise predictions and rigorous methods of testing hypotheses, especially reproducible experiments involving quantifiable predictions and measurements. Mathematics and Physics can be considered as exact sciences in this sense. The difference between Mathematics and Physics is that Mathematics does not describe physical reality whereas Physics does.

    The term implies a dichotomy between these fields and others, such as the humanities. Related but not equivalent terms are hard science, pure science, and fundamental science.

    Math is just about as much of an exact science as you can get.

    Your calculators may not be exact but math, itself, is. Thanks for playing.

    LL

  7. Anonymous says

    Off subject but just wondering.

    I have about 1,000.00 in state quarter rolls I got from my local bank when each one came out.

    Should I dump them at the bank and use the money for something else,or hang on to them

  8. Anonymous says

    Depends if you find a buyer to pay enough of a premium for them that it makes it worth selling. Or, you can cherry pick select rolls that have value and hold on to them and cashing the others.

    I don't collect the series so I am taking a stab in the dark.

  9. Anonymous says

    Could be that someone might pay a premium for the whole set as a single lot. May be useful to look into the possibility…

  10. Anonymous says

    There was a dealer in Indiana who was paying premiums for state quarter rolls a couple of years ago, but I don't know if that still applies or not. He had published a list of buy prices then, some of which weren't too bad.

    I can't remember who he was, but Dave Harper at Numismatic News would be able to tell you if you e-mailed him to ask.

  11. Anonymous says

    "Math is not an exact science. I have had 2 different calculators give 2 different percentages. In that case the accepted procedure is to use the average of the two values."

    This is funny, two calculators might have different rounding errors, but not enough to affect the relative answer. Almost every transaction in your daily life involves rounding the amount. Are you really expecting exact change when you purchase the hamburger meal at McDonalds for $4.99 plus 9% tax and you gave $6. Are you going to complain because they gave you $0.56 instead of $0.5609?

  12. Anonymous says

    Gold and silver have experienced a significant loss as of late. I am not sure, but it feels like a big correction in precious metals, I am afraid greater drops are ahead.

  13. Anonymous says

    @10:02am

    I hope a bigger correction is coming. Corrections are necessary for a sustainable long term bull market.

  14. Anonymous says

    I hope PM's keep dropping. At least twice in the past few weeks I wanted to buy more silver but held off. I paid off my student loan but still have that amount budgeted. I might pick up grams of gold each month with the money that I've been using for my loan. Sort of do a automatic investment plan; buy whatever I can with the amount budgeted each month.

  15. Anonymous says

    As for me I see the metal price dropping as a great opportunity to buy as it ain't gonna last. There is no economic stability in the world and the politicians of the world like to paper over the problems with money printing. The oil reserve release is a very temporary measure unless the gov't releases a lot more of it which is possible. No politician of any party wants 4 dolla gas before an election next year. So I say its time to load up on the yellow metal coins of your choice and silver if you buy bullion. Unforturnately it would take a massive drop in silver price for the Mint to adjust their silver products downward.

  16. Anonymous says

    so how long before the mint adjusts gold prices if the price stays below $1500?

  17. Anonymous says

    Central Banks from Asia, Europe and US are going to print a lot of paper money to fend off the ecnomic slowdown in the near future. I am taking advantage of the soft patch on silver now and will put more money into gold if correction continues. An annual return of 20% would beat the equity investment over the next few years.

  18. Anonymous says

    if silver drop below $30 i will be a big buyer. the potential of stock equity is unclear for the next few years. S&P profits will not go much higher due to tightening of consumers. Buying PM is a way to balance the poforlio. It is true that Soros sold all his profolio in PM, but small investor like me already learn to be nimble and keep more cash in hand than the hedges. we learn to buy on the dip and get out before the big guys.

  19. Anonymous says

    I noticed that some coin dealers are selling US unc eagles as being struck at the San Francisco Mint. Since the US Mint said they would make coins struck at the West Point mint and SF mint indistinguisable, how is it possible that these dealers can make such claims?

  20. Anonymous says

    Well, they want to make such claims so that so dumb sucker will pay extra for it. Just like some grading Co. slabbing a coin and people will pay EXTRA for it! There's definately a market for suckers out there.

  21. Anonymous says

    The silver eagles struck at San Francisco ARE distinguishable from those struck at West Point when they are first shipped out in the green monster boxes. The SF boxes have straps that say "San Francisco" and the WP boxes have straps that say "West Point."

    Dealers can submit sealed boxes for grading, and the slabs will state the coins were struck at San Francisco.

    The novelty will fade in time, but for now dealers are capitalizing on that novelty factor to get buyers to pay extra for the SF silver eagles. I saw one AP selling sealed monster boxes of the SF coins for $1 extra each. $500 for the novelty. No thanks!

  22. Anonymous says

    The 'monster boxes' of eagles have label with their origin on them, and the grading services will put the SF designation on the holders if it comes from one of these unopened boxes from SF.

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